Coronavirus symptoms update: Six signs that may predict the virus’s severity

Coronavirus symptoms update: Six signs that may predict the virus’s severity

The deadly continues to fuel much speculation and confusion, with some patients making a full recovery and others not as lucky. Now a new study has pinpointed a person’s symptoms, placing symptoms in six different lists, to better determine who may need hospitalisation.

The six cluster symptoms warning of a potential severe fatality 

Flu-like with no fever: Headache, loss of smell, muscle pains, cough, sore throat, chest pain, no fever

Flu-like with fever: Headache, loss of smell, cough, sore throat, hoarseness, fever, loss of appetite

Gastrointestinal: Headache, loss of smell, loss of appetite, diarrhoea, sore throat, chest pain, no cough

Severe level one, fatigue: Headache, loss of smell, cough, fever, hoarseness, chest pain, fatigue

Severe level two, confusion: Headache, loss of smell, loss of appetite, cough, fever, hoarseness, sore throat, chest pain, fatigue, confusion, muscle pain

Severe level three, abdominal and respiratory: Headache, loss of smell, loss of appetite, cough, fever, hoarseness, sore throat, chest pain, fatigue, confusion, muscle pain, shortness of breath, diarrhoea, abdominal pain

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Patients with symptoms in clusters 4, 5 or 6 were more likely to be older, overweight adults suffering with either diabetes or lung diseases.

Low percentages of patients with cluster 1,2 or 3 symptoms required breathing support such as a ventilator, however, nearly 20 percent of those with cluster 6 symptoms needed help breathing.

Nearly half of the patients in cluster 6 had to be hospitalised, compared with just 16 percent of those in cluster 1, the study determined.

The researchers used a machine learning algorithm to help analyse different reports from over 1,600 British and American users of the app.

Users included in the study had tested positive for COVID-19 and reported their symptoms regularly using the app since March, the study said.

The study showed how imperative it is for a person to carefully monitor their symptoms and to be able to determine which cluster they may fall in.

The app is a collaboration between King’s College London and other partners. 

Published at Thu, 06 Aug 2020 14:55:44 +0000