Harry wanted to break parents’ ‘cycle of pain’ but has copied Diana’s most hurtful actions

Harry wanted to break parents’ ‘cycle of pain’ but has copied Diana’s most hurtful actions

Prince Harry: Charles ‘bewildered’ by comments says expert

Harry has lifted the lid on his mental health struggle behind Palace walls in a new podcast episode of the ‘Armchair Expert’. He said that he felt he was “in a zoo” as a royal, and he realised early in his Twenties that he didn’t want the “job”. Harry also said: “I didn’t want to be doing this [royal job], look what it did to my mum, how am I ever going to settle down, I have a wife and a family when I know it’s going to happen again.”

He then went on to claim he did not want to pass on the “genetic pain and suffering” from his parents, which helped motivate him to leave the monarchy.

Prince Charles is said to feel “bewildered” by his youngest son’s latest claims, according to royal commentator Roya Nikkhah, having already felt “cut up” about Harry’s allegations about their relationship in the Oprah Winfrey interview.

In the meantime comparisons between the Duke of Sussex and his mother Princess Diana have multiplied ever since he stepped down from royal duties last year.

In the podcast, Harry said he still feels “so connected to my mum” and that he wanted to make Diana proud by using “this platform to really affect change”.

Harry wanted to break parents’ ‘cycle of pain’ but has copied Diana’s most hurtful actions

Harry wanted to break parents’ ‘cycle of pain’ but has copied Diana’s most hurtful actions (Image: Getty)

Harry and Meghan's interview with Oprah Winfrey shook royal spheres

Harry and Meghan’s interview with Oprah Winfrey shook royal spheres (Image: Getty)

Most recently, Harry and Meghan’s bombshell interview with Oprah lifted the lid on their frustrations with the Palace and explained why they left the Royal Family last year.

They made serious allegations against the Palace’s approach to mental health and to race, with royal watchers around the world wondering if the couple had triggered the beginning of the end of the monarchy.

Similar concerns were raised when Diana revealed the extent of her misery behind Palace walls in 1995, in an astounding interview with BBC Panorama.

Like the Sussexes, she explained how her mental health had suffered in the public eye and suggested the Firm had done little to help her.

Just as Harry put Charles in the firing line by claiming he “stopped taking my calls”, and that he had been “financially cut off” by the Royal Family, Diana questioned her then-husband’s suitability for the throne and discussed his infidelity, again harming his reputation.

The Duke of Sussex also showed more sympathy towards Diana’s life as a royal than towards Charles by expressing his support for Netflix’s fictionalised series, The Crown, back in February.

READ MORE:  Meghan and Harry’s therapy claims at odds with each other

Diana speaking to Martin Bashir on BBC Panorama in 1995

Diana speaking to Martin Bashir on BBC Panorama in 1995 (Image: Getty)

He said that it was “not strictly accurate”, but claimed it gave “a rough idea” of the pressures that come with “putting duty and service above family and everything else”.

This was particularly telling as Charles’ friends had alleged that this show was “trolling on a Hollywood budget” as it cast the Prince of Wales in a particularly unfavourable light, while presenting Diana positively.

Additionally, The Crown’s most recent season recreated scenes from the astounding 1992 book, ‘Diana: Her True Story — In Her Own Words’, a biography created from tapes the Princess secretly recorded about her misery as Charles’ wife.

Harry and Diana were both 35 when they officially split from the Royal Family, too.

Diana officially divorced Charles in 1996, meaning she officially stopped being a working representative for the Queen.

In a piece from 1997, journalist Cathy Horyn said members of Diana’s inner circle used to use terms like “liberation” to describe her post-royal life, “as if she had recently been sprung from Bedlam, or worse”.

Similarly, Meghan claimed they are “not just surviving but thriving” in their new California life, while Harry said in the podcast that he could “actually lift my head and I feel different” after talking about the difficulties of being “trapped” in the monarchy.

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Harry said on the podcast that he still feels

Harry said on the podcast that he still feels “connected” to his mother (Image: Getty)

Diana had a big impact on her two sons, William and Harry

Diana had a big impact on her two sons, William and Harry (Image: Getty)

Diana was reportedly considered moving abroad, too, and had considered buying a second home in California.

Other reports allege the Princess of Wales briefly thought about pursuing a career on the big-screen, according to biographer Howard Hodgson, although it’s thought she put this to the side out of fear of upsetting the royals.

Meghan and Harry, on the other hand, have already made their names in the entertainment industry through incredibly lucrative deals with Netflix and Spotify, and several appearances on TV and YouTube.

However, Harry did tell podcast host Dax Shepard that he did not want to assign “blame” to either of his parents.

Harry and Meghan with Archie in California - Harry wants to raise Archie differently

Harry and Meghan with Archie in California – Harry wants to raise Archie differently (Image: Instagram @themayhew)

He explained: “I don’t think we should be pointing the finger or blaming anybody, but certainly when it comes to parenting, if I’ve experienced some form of pain or suffering because of the pain or suffering that perhaps my father or my parents had suffered, I’m going to make sure I break that cycle so that I don’t pass it on, basically.

“It’s a lot of genetic pain and suffering that gets passed on anyway so we as parents should be doing the most we can to try and say, ‘You know what, that happened to me, I’m going to make sure that doesn’t happen to you’.”

He added: “It’s hard to do but for me it comes down to awareness.

“I never saw it, I never knew about it, and then suddenly I started to piece it together and: ‘Okay, so this is where he went to school, this is what happened, I know this about his life, I also know that is connected to his parents so that means he’s treated me the way he was treated, so how can I change that for my own kids?’”

Published at Fri, 14 May 2021 14:12:00 +0000