Michael Schumacher’s former manager blasts F1 legend’s family for ‘lies’ over condition

Michael Schumacher’s former manager blasts F1 legend’s family for ‘lies’ over condition

Michael Schumacher‘s former manager, Willi Weber, has struck out at the former Ferrari star’s family for ‘lying’ about the aftermath of his near-fatal skiing accident in 2013. Schumacher completely withdrew from the public eye following the incident, which saw him placed into a medically-induced coma for six months.

The German fell and hit his head on a rock while skiing with his son, Mick, back in 2013. Despite wearing a ski helmet, the accident caused a severe brain injury and Schumacher did not fully regain consciousness until six months later. 

Just one year prior, Schumacher completed his final year in F1 with Mercedes, but the bulk of his sporting success came with Ferrari and Benetton as he scooped up a record-equalling seven world titles. Only Lewis Hamilton can rival the 53-year-old in terms of accolades and achievements, with the Brit overtaking his Grand Prix win tally last season. 

Weber, who first signed Schumacher to his Formula Three team in the 1980s, has lashed out at his former client’s family over a lack of access and ‘lies’ following his skiing accident. 

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“I think dad and me, we would understand each other in a different way now. Simply because we speak a similar language – the language of motorsport,” he said. “We would have had much more to talk about and that is where my head is most of the time, thinking that would be so cool. That would be it. I would give up everything just for that. Yes.”

“Since the accident, of course, these experiences, these moments that I believe many people have with their parents are no longer present, or to a lesser extent. In my view, that is a little unfair.”

“It was a huge pain for me,” Weber told Gazzetta dello Sport. “I tried hundreds of times to contact [his wife] Corinna and she didn’t answer. I called Jean Todt to ask him if I should go to the hospital and he told me to wait – it’s too early.

“I called the next day and no one answered. I didn’t expect behaviour like that and I’m still angry about it. They kept me out, telling me it’s too early, well now it’s too late. It’s been nine years. Maybe they should just say it the way it is.

“I think dad and me, we would understand each other in a different way now. Simply because we speak a similar language – the language of motorsport,” he said. “We would have had much more to talk about and that is where my head is most of the time, thinking that would be so cool. That would be it. I would give up everything just for that. Yes.”

“Since the accident, of course, these experiences, these moments that I believe many people have with their parents are no longer present, or to a lesser extent. In my view, that is a little unfair.”

Published at Tue, 19 Jul 2022 08:52:36 +0000